Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Faculty (x,y) 2010 Seminar at UMBC invites questions from Graduate Students

Each year, PROMISE and the Graduate School host a dinner seminar that allows students to ask questions of faculty. This year, our 4th annual "When Faculty Say 'X', They Really Mean 'Y'" seminar will be held on Friday, October 22, 2010 in Lecture Hall 4 of the Academic 4 Building. If you would like to post questions anonymously, you may post them here.

To view a sample of last year's questions, click here: http://promisecommunitybuilding.blogspot.com/2009/09/grad-student-faculty-community-building.html.

Please RSVP for this seminar at http://my.umbc.edu/groups/promise/events/4750

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

If a student has a good scientific internship opportunity, how can he convince his advisor to let him go for the summer, or even for a few weeks?

Anonymous said...

Can someone explain the benchmark for the term "just work hard?" This term seems nebulous. How much is enough?

Anonymous said...

I know some students who would not dare tell their advisor that they have no interests in working in the professoriate, for fear that their advisor will give them less attention. Why are some advisors uninterested in career paths different from their own.

Anonymous said...

How can you respectfully disagree with your advisor? If your advisor is overloading with work that is not a part of your thesis project, how can you respectfully tell him/her 'NO'!?

Anonymous said...

How can graduate students best understand and exceed the advisor's expectations?

Anonymous said...

Regarding selecting a mentor to work in his/her lab to conduct research, what recommendations would you provide or things to keep in mind when doing so if my research interests don't fall exactly in a particular lab?

Anonymous said...

What do I do if after completing research under my current advisor for a master's, I want to switch to another advisor within the same department for the doctorate?

Anonymous said...

What is the best way to arrange a meeting time with your instructor if they are an adjunct professor?

Marvin Carr said...

If a master's students in STEM, would like to continue their education buy studying Higher Education or Policy in a PhD program, what sort of things should he or she be doing?

Anonymous said...

If you want to learn some new techniques that you think will help you secure a job in the industry later but they are not techniques usually learnt in your advisors lab..whats the best way to go about it ?

Anonymous said...

I have a problem in a class. We talked to the professor but the professor went and talked to the department chair. Then the chair started accusing students of being taking an advantage of a young professor. We feel like there is no one in our side to talk about. What should we do?

Anonymous said...

How do you know when a faculty member is pleased with your work? Will they ever tell you outright if you are doing well or not?

Anonymous said...

Prioritize these three items:
TA responsibilities
Coursework
Research responsibilities
Assume that equal priority cannot be given.

Anonymous said...

What's the best way to approach a professor that you're interested in doing a post doc with? How can you tell if they may also be interested, or if they're giving you subtle hints to the contrary?

Anonymous said...

Do I have the right to tell a professor when he or she is wrong and if so, how do I go about it?

Anonymous said...

In general, what could be some reasons for why my advisor refuses to set up regular meetings with me? I am in the proposal writing stage.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your participation! We will submit all questions that were posted prior to this point to the faculty for today's seminar. We will not be able to use any additional questions for this year's session. Again, thank you for your participation in the "When Faculty Say 'x', They Really Mean 'y'" seminar!

Best regards,
The PROMISE staff

PROMISE Community Building - A Place for Graduate Students.

PROMISE: Maryland's Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) seeks to increase the numbers and diversity of Ph.D.s in the STEM fields by building community and supporting graduate students from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Here, we salute the spirit of PROMISE!
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